Yale Postdoctoral Trainees

Requiem for an Electric Chair

YSC presents a theatrical masterpiece that celebrates the powerful effects of truth-telling as an art form and blurs the boundaries between performance and daily life. The critically acclaimed one-man play, Requiem for an Electric Chair, will be presented to the Yale and New Haven communities on September 14 at 7:30pm. (Doors open at 7pm.)
This event is open to the public.

Latin American Policy Leader Series: Visit of Regional Director of UN Women for Latin America & Caribbean: “Diversity, Equality, and Gender”

The Yale MacMillan Center Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies, Fox International Fellowship Program, and Program on Peace and Development are delighted to announce the 2022 Latin American Policy Leader Series.
From January to May 2022, the Yale community will have the opportunity to hear from and discuss with high-level Latin American experts and policymakers about how we can work together towards a more equal and just world.

Transforming Education in times of Emergencies: Perspectives from Sierra Leone

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host the discussion, “Transforming Education in times of Emergencies: Perspectives from Sierra Leone,” with David Moinina Sengeh, Minister of Basic and Senior Secondary Education and Chief Innovation Officer for the Directorate of Science, Technology and Innovation in Sierra Leone.
The conversation will be moderated by Clare Lockhart, Jackson Senior Fellow.

Connecting Past to Present: Building a Cultural Heritage Center in Lagos, Nigeria

Join us for the launch of the Yale IPCH Public Talks: a series dedicated to exploring global perspectives and critical developments that impact cultural heritage preservation. In this inaugural event, this distinguished expert panel will contextualize the highly anticipated John Randle Centre for Yoruba History and Culture within the economic, social, and cultural landscape of Lagos, the most populous city on the African continent.

PRFDHR Seminar: Combining Perspective-getting with Information Delivery to Increase Public Support for Refugees, Professor Scott R. Williamson

Many Americans hold negative views of refugees, and misinformation about refugees is a common feature of American politics. Nonetheless, we know relatively little about the accuracy of Americans’ perceptions of the US refugee population, and whether countering misinformation can shape attitudes toward refugees and refugee policy. Professor Scott Williamson addresses these questions by first implementing a survey measuring Americans’ knowledge about refugees in the United States. He finds that Americans are surprisingly well-informed about the refugee population in general.

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