General Public

Ecologies, Environmentalisms, and the Black Sacred Arts conference

From May 13-15, 2024, Yale Institute of Sacred Music’s third conference on the Black sacred arts will convene scholars and artists in New Haven, CT to explore connections between the Black sacred arts, ecology, and environmental concerns.

Keynote speakers will include Tracey Hucks, the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Africana Religious Studies at Harvard Divinity School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Dianne M. Stewart, the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Emory University.

Ecologies, Environmentalisms, and the Black Sacred Arts conference

From May 13-15, 2024, Yale Institute of Sacred Music’s third conference on the Black sacred arts will convene scholars and artists in New Haven, CT to explore connections between the Black sacred arts, ecology, and environmental concerns.

Keynote speakers will include Tracey Hucks, the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Africana Religious Studies at Harvard Divinity School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Dianne M. Stewart, the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Emory University.

The Black Indian Ocean: Slavery, Religion, and Identity (1400-1700)

The Yale Institute of Sacred Music will host a one-day webinar and interdisciplinary symposium organized by ISM fellow Dr. Janie Cole. “The Black Indian Ocean: Slavery, Religion, and Identity (1400-1700)” will explore new perspectives on the impact of slavery and patterns of migration and displacement across the Indian Ocean on Afro-Asian communities, their cultural manifestations and soundscapes, and how religion, faith and ritual were articulated in acts of identity, oppression, and resistance in the early modern world.

The Bookshop of Black Queer Diaspora: On the Contents of Rotimi Fani-Kayode’s Trunk

About this program
In recognition of Worlds AIDS Day on December 1, 2023, this talk will examine the history of neoliberalism and neocolonialism in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States as well as the history of Black queer art and activism through a series of visits to a make-believe Black queer bookshop and gallery. While the visits are fictional, the objects in the bookshop and their histories are real. The trunk owned by the Nigerian-born British photographer Rotimi Fani-Kayode (1955–1989) will be a focus of this talk.

An Islamic Commons? Reflections on environmental, economic, and social stewardship from an indigenous apiary in Morocco

Dr. Salah Chafik’s research is inspired by the age-old question and notion of ‘living and doing good’ or السعادة القصوى (eudaimonia). He studies the pursuit & understanding of public value creation beyond a global Western paradigm, focusing on purpose-driven indigenous institutions rooted in Islam. In particular, he is interested in the role of these institutions in delivering public services to, taking on challenges for, and shaping the business and wider socio-economic environment of their communities.

CAS Talk: African Solutions to Africa's Problems in a Multi Polar World - Proposals by the 2023 World Fellows from Africa

African Solutions to Africa’s Problems in a Multi Polar World - Proposals by the 2023 World Fellows from Africa

Featuring:

Abdouramane Diallo: Increasing intra Africa trade, a Strategic Imperative for Africa
Naasu Fofanah: Promoting African Women’s Economic Empowerment Through Innovative Financing
Ann Iyonu: Unconventional Diplomacy in Africa
Janah Ncube: Positioning the African Union to Respond to Geopolitical Pressures in a Multi Polar World

Sarah Osterhoudt: Vigilant Fields: Self-Surveillance in the Vanilla Boom

The core of the Agrarian Studies Program’s activities is a weekly colloquium organized around an annual theme. Invited specialists send papers in advance that are the focus of an organized discussion by the faculty and graduate students associated with the colloquium.
This topic embraces, inter alia, the study of mutual perceptions between countryside and city, and patterns of cultural and material exchange, extraction, migration, credit, legal systems, and political order that link them.

PRFDHR Seminar: AI, Digital Identities, Biometrics, Blockchain: How the Use of Technology is Changing Migration Globally, Dr. Raphaela Schweiger

The seminar led by Dr. Raphaela Schweiger will delve into the profound impacts of digitalization and technological advancements on migration and refugee policies. In a world shaped by rapid technological change, this seminar offers an exploration of the evolving landscape, both globally and in some specific cases in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and North America. Technology has already begun reshaping the experiences of migrants, refugees, and those on the move.

From scars of war to diplomatic leadership: a talk with the Foreign Minister of Sierra Leone

The International Leadership Center and the MacMillan Center Council on African Studies will host a conversation with Timothy Musa Kabba who will discuss his personal journey from child soldier to Minister of Foreign Affairs, leading his country’s efforts in the UN Security Council as it navigates global food and energy shocks and regional coups. Also a former Minister of Mines and Mineral Resources, he will discuss the role of natural resources in Sierra Leone’s development agenda.

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