General Public

PRFDHR Seminar: When does Migration Law Discriminate against Women?, Dr. Catherine Briddick

It is possible to identify gendered disadvantage at almost every point in a migrant woman’s journey, physical and legal, from country of origin to country of destination, from admission to naturalization. Rules which explicitly distribute migration opportunities differently on the grounds of sex/gender, such as prohibitions on certain women’s emigration, may produce such disadvantage. Women may also, however, be disadvantaged by facially gender-neutral rules.

Mondays at Beinecke: Ethiopic Manuscripts and Global Books with Kristen Herdman

Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/3gW7PpE
Kristen Herdman is a PhD Candidate in the Medieval Studies program. Her research interests are rooted in art historical approaches to manuscript studies, with special attention to fifteenth-century medieval devotional books and the complex relationship between text and image.

Good Society Forum: Human Rights Protection in Africa

The new normal way of living as a result of COVID-19 has huge repercussions on the human rights (economic, social and cultural rights) of most vulnerable groups. Human rights as defined by the UN means ‘’rights that are fundamental to all human beings regardless of race, sex, ethnicity, nationality, language, religion or any other status. These rights include the right to life and liberty, freedom from slavery and torture, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to work and education, and many more such as clean environment have become important to uphold.

Conversation with Hopewell Chin'ono

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a conversation with Hopewell Chin’ono, a Zimbabwean human rights activist, award-winning journalist, and documentary filmmaker. The event is co-sponsored by the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism.
  


Chin’ono will speak about his exposure of corruption in Zimbabwe, the ruling government’s repeated detention of him and others seeking justice and share his ideas about how the international community and the Biden Administration can assist Zimbabweans. 

Physical and Mental Health of Refugees: A COVID-19 Update

This 6th annual refugee health educational event will provide updates for health care providers and community members regarding ongoing clinical and non-clinical domestic advocacy efforts to support the health of refugee families during the Covid-19 pandemic. The conference will take place virtually as part of Yale Medicine’s Global Health Day Activities on March 18, 2021.
Conference Programme
6:00-6:15 pm: Welcome and State of the Union
An update on the current politics of the US refugee program, changes to the Yale Refugee Clinic
Ani Annamalai and Maya Prabhu

Mondays at Beinecke: Sketches of the Amistad Captives & Contemporary Commemoration

The Beinecke Library stewards a set of 22 pencil drawings of the Amistad captives as they awaited trial in New Haven, 1839-40. The sketches were done by William H. Townsend, a New Havener who was about 18 years old when he made the drawings. George Miles of the Beinecke Library will discuss the drawings. and Joy Burns, a member of the contemporary Amistad Committee, will discuss the resonance of this event in history for New Haven and the nation today and share efforts to commemorate the Amistad now and for the future.

Mondays at Beinecke: Richard Wright and Ghana with Kodwo Eshun

Kodwo Eshun is a writer, theorist, and filmmaker. His research interests include contemporary art and critical theory with particular reference to postwar liberation movements, modern and contemporary musicality, cybernetic theory, the cinematic soundtrack and archaeologies of futurity.
Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/3dhmr0T
Eshun will speak about his ongoing research in relation to Richard Wright and the Gold Coast, including work with materials in the Richard Wright Papers in the Beinecke Library.

Transpositions: Dance Poems for an Online World - Part 3, Lacina Coulibaly (Video Premiere)

Witness what happens when Yale Dance Lab in partnership with the Yale Schwarzman Center invites 16 choreographers to create digital dance poems, performed by dancers from across the Yale community. Knitting together local, national, and international communities of dance, Transpositions: Dance Poems for an Online World explores the continuous and interrupted transmission of embodied dance practices in digital life. Edited by by Kyla Arsadjaja MFA ‘20, the concept and direction of this episode is by Lacina Coulibaly.

Transpositions: Dance Poems for an Online World - Part 1, Gregory Maqoma (Video Premiere)

Witness what happens when Yale Dance Lab in partnership with Yale Schwarzman Center invites 16 choreographers to create digital dance poems, performed by dancers from across the Yale community. Knitting together local, national, and international communities of dance, “Transpositions: Dance Poems for an Online World” explores the continuous and interrupted transmission of embodied dance practices in digital life. Edited by by Kyla Arsadjaja MFA’20, the concept and direction of this episode is by Gregory Maqoma.

Art & Protest in Nigeria with Anthony Obayomi

Anthony Obayomi is a storyteller from Lagos, Nigeria who uses photography, filmmaking, and other storytelling techniques that combine art and technology in both traditional and experimental media. Obayomi’s documentary work is aimed at offering alternative perspectives to diverse audiences. He portrays people, society, and culture with the aim of fostering tolerance, mitigating stereotypes, questioning traditional opinions, and addressing issues of social justice. Obayomi earned a bachelor’s degree in visual arts from the University of Lagos.

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