Faculty

Political Competition as a Trigger for Instability in Africa

This webinar will explore how political competition devolve to destabilizing conflicts in Africa and the peculiar elements that make these trend rampant. It will interrogate various conflicts in the region and the nature of interventions that were deployed to address them. It will further explore the relevant steps and reforms needed to prevent these conflicts. It will also rely on firsthand account of mediators and political leaders in the panel to analyze the place of leadership and altruism in ensuring national stability and healthy democratic competition.
Speakers:

PRFDHR Seminar: Activism from Exile: How Activists Abroad Influence Politics Back Home, Professor Elizabeth Nugent

How do activists in exile mobilize citizens back home, and how do regimes respond when they do? In an on-going book project titled Exiles: How Activist Abroad Influence Politics Back Home, Professor Elizabeth Nugent investigates politics in exile, whether and how activists persist in activism once they are forcibly dislocated from their homeland, by drawing on insights from research on the biographical effects of activism, psycho-behavioral effects of trauma and emotion, and forced migration.

PRFDHR Seminar: Global Mobile Inventors, Dr. Dany Bahar

Dr. Bahar will present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of knowledge production and diffusion linked to global mobile inventors (GMIs). Together with his co-authors, Dr Bahar finds that GMIs are essential team members of the first few patents in technology classes new to the country of residence as compared to patents filed at later stages. They interpret these results as tangible evidence of GMIs facilitating the technology-specific diffusion of knowledge across nations.

PRFDHR Seminar: Understanding the Causal Impact of Climate on Human Conflict, Professor Marshall Burke

Scholars, writers, and policymakers from Shakespeare to Obama have noted linkages between the physical environment and human behavior toward one another. Professor Burke synthesizes a growing cottage industry of research that seeks to quantitatively measure how changes in climate can affect various types of human conflict. He re-analyzes dozens of individual studies using a common empirical framework and uses Bayesian techniques to study whether – and why – effect sizes differ across settings.

PRFDHR Seminar: When does Migration Law Discriminate against Women?, Dr. Catherine Briddick

It is possible to identify gendered disadvantage at almost every point in a migrant woman’s journey, physical and legal, from country of origin to country of destination, from admission to naturalization. Rules which explicitly distribute migration opportunities differently on the grounds of sex/gender, such as prohibitions on certain women’s emigration, may produce such disadvantage. Women may also, however, be disadvantaged by facially gender-neutral rules.

When Did Slavery End in the United States for African-Americans?

Join the Yale African American Affinity Group, Yale Latino Networking Group, Future Leaders of Yale, Working Women’s Network, and Asian Network at Yale for a Juneteenth event titled “When Did Slavery End in the United States for African-Americans?” We will be joined by Dr. Antoinette Harrell, Johnny Lee Gaddy, and Stephanie Suzanne Franklin, Esq.

Good Society Forum: Human Rights Protection in Africa

The new normal way of living as a result of COVID-19 has huge repercussions on the human rights (economic, social and cultural rights) of most vulnerable groups. Human rights as defined by the UN means ‘’rights that are fundamental to all human beings regardless of race, sex, ethnicity, nationality, language, religion or any other status. These rights include the right to life and liberty, freedom from slavery and torture, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to work and education, and many more such as clean environment have become important to uphold.

Conversation with Hopewell Chin'ono

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a conversation with Hopewell Chin’ono, a Zimbabwean human rights activist, award-winning journalist, and documentary filmmaker. The event is co-sponsored by the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism.
  


Chin’ono will speak about his exposure of corruption in Zimbabwe, the ruling government’s repeated detention of him and others seeking justice and share his ideas about how the international community and the Biden Administration can assist Zimbabweans. 

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