Alumni

Being Creative in the Aftermath of Genocide: Rwandan Artists Reflect on Collaborative Practices of Memory, Tradition, and Invention Across Genres

This public event features three young Rwandan artists working in painting, music, acting, and poetry. Their work engages multiple senses (sight, hearing, touch) as they work to care for traditional artistic practices while also inventing new modes of expression. To begin the event, each of the three artists will speak for 15-20 minutes about their work. Then the moderator will ask questions for the three of them, and then we will take questions from the audience.

PRFDHR Seminar: Multisectoral Approaches to Improving Mental Health and Psychosocial Wellbeing in Humanitarian Settings, Professor Claire Greene

There is consensus that humanitarian actors should respond to the mental health and psychosocial needs of displaced populations through multisectoral action and coordination. Multisectoral programming may enable the integration of mental health and psychosocial support with services designed to address critical social and structural determinants of mental health including poverty, stigma, safety and security, and social connectedness and cohesion. In this presentation, Professor M.

PRFDHR Seminar: Rejecting Coethnicity: the Politics of Migrant Exclusion by Minoritized Citizens, Professor Yang-Yang Zhou

Professor Yang-Yang Zhou will be presenting the research of her new book project ‘Rejecting Coethnicity: the Politics of Migrant Exclusion by Minoritized Citizens’. How are migrants received by host countries and communities? A substantial body of scholarship on migrant reception focuses almost exclusively on majority White citizens in the Global North and their (negative) attitudes towards migrants from the Global South.

PRFDHR Seminar: Assessing the Direct and Spillover Effects of Shocks to Refugee Remittances, Professor Sarah Walker

Professor Sarah Walker examines the impact of an exogenous shutdown of remittances to the Kakuma refugee camp in northern Kenya in 2015. She finds that the shutdown did not reduce refugee consumption on average. However, for households that previously received remittances through the networks that were shutdown, consumption decreased, while for those who continued to receive remittances through other mechanisms, consumption increased.

Windham-Campbell Festival: One (More) Night in the Roof Nightclub

Ishion Hutchinson will play a mash up of Jamaican music—ska, rocksteady, reggae and especially 1970s dub. Cooking up a dancing elixir, other genres will also be played. The session will be interspersed with performance of original dub poetry and a screening of a short film. Guest DJ appearance by Jonah Mixon-Webster.
Iconic local restaurant Sandra’s Next Generation will also be serving up a soul food feast!

Windham-Campbell Festival: Turner Turned Inside Out

Winsome Pinnock’s most recent play, Rockets and Blue Lights, takes the audience on a deep dive into J. M. W. Turner’s painting “The Slave Ship,” asking questions about received and shared history. She is joined by past prize recipient Branden-Jacobs Jenkins in a discussion about how theater can help us look more fully into history.
A complementary display of works by J. M. W. Turner, including sketchbook drawings and color studies, finished watercolors, and prints, will be on view in the Yale Center for British Study Room that day.

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